Article reference: UK-IA-CP03

Share capital

This article explains the law surrounding authorised share capital; allotment and cancellation of shares; types of shares; restructuring share capital and share transfers.

 
 

Contents

Share capital and authorised capital

Can a company change its authorised capital

Allotment of shares

 

 

Share capital and authorised capital

When a company is formed, the memorandum of association will state:

  • the amount of share capital the company has, and;
  • the division of the share capital into shares of a fixed sum each

The shareholders must agree to subscribe for some, or all, of the shares, at their nominal value. That is to say, they will subscribe one pound for each one pound share, or as the case may be.

The memorandum of association must show the names of the people (subscribers) who have agreed to take shares and the number of shares each will take.

Authorised capital is the amount of share capital stated in the memorandum of association.

A company may have share capital in any sum.

Can a company change its share capital?

A company can increase its authorised share capital by passing an ordinary resolution (unless its articles of association require a special resolution). A copy of the resolution - and notice of the increase on Form 123 - must reach Companies House within 15 days of being passed. No fee is payable to Companies House.

A company can decrease its authorised share capital by passing an ordinary resolution to cancel shares which have not been taken or agreed to be taken by any person. Notice of the cancellation, on Form 122, must reach Companies House within one month. No fee is payable to Companies House.

What is issued capital?

Issued capital is the nominal value of the shares issued to shareholders. On the day a company is formed, the true value of one share with a nominal value of a one pound, will also be one pound. The company has cash of one pound and the allottee has a share with a nominal value of one pound. That is known as the “par value”.

The moment the company starts to trade it will either make money or lose money. If it makes money, the value of cash and other assets, like debts due to it, has increased, maybe a lot, maybe a little. So the shares are still, and will always be, nominally one pound shares by they are now worth something more. The nominal value is the same but the real value has increased. The difference is called the “premium”.

A company may issue shares only with authority of the shareholders. This requires certain paperwork and the submission of details to Companies House when all has been done.

Reducing issued capital

The number of issued shares can be reduced. A reduction requires either an order of the Court, or a resolution approved by at least 75% of the shareholders. A reduction is rare, and for specific reasons which are beyond the scope of this article. It may involve re-denomination of the shares into shares of a different par value, and / or a consolidation, or change based on some other technical formula.

Allotment of shares

Allotment is the process of issuing new shares to existing or new shareholders.

New shares are available to be allotted (the formal word for “issued”) at any time the shareholders so authorise. Allotments also require the proper process.

More people may be admitted as members of the company and are allotted shares. However, the directors must not allot shares without the authority of the existing shareholders. The authority will either be stated in the company's articles of association or given to the directors by resolution passed at a general meeting of the company.

Types of resolution required to give authority to allot shares

It is lawful, and usual, for the shareholders to delegate advance authority to the directors to allot a specific number of shares. The circumstances when they may do this are set out as part of the resolution which gives the power. It is usually for a fixed period of weeks or months. The legal maximum is five years. The company must deliver a copy of a resolution to Companies House within 15 days of the motion to do so being passed.

Bonus shares

If authorised by its articles, a company may use any undistributed profits, or any sum credited to the company's share premium account or capital redemption reserve in order to finance an issue of wholly or partly paid up bonus shares to the members in proportion to their existing holdings. The shareholders to whom the shares are issued pay nothing. This exercise does not change the value of the company owned by each shareholder. It is an exercise most often undertaken by a public company for public relations purposes.

Please note that the information provided on this page:

  • Does not provide a complete or authoritative statement of the law;
  • Does not constitute legal advice by Net Lawman;
  • Does not create a contractual relationship;
  • Does not form part of any other advice, whether paid or free.
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