Section 25 notice: Form 7

Statutory form and explanatory notes for landlord's notice to end a business tenancy (with reasons for refusing a new tenancy) where the Leasehold Reform Act 1967 may apply.

Suitable for use in: England & Wales
  • Solicitor approved
  • Plain English makes editing easy
  • Guidance notes included
  • Money back guarantee
About
Preview
Why from us
Ask a question
Customer reviews

About this document

This notice complies with section 25 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954 and paragraph 10 of the schedule to the Leasehold Reform Act 1967.

A landlord will use this form where he or she wishes to oppose the grant of a new tenancy, and the tenant may be entitled to acquire the freehold or an extended lease.

Complete this form, using our guidance notes to help you and send it to the tenant. If you are opposed to the grant of a new tenancy, and the tenant is not entitled to acquire the freehold or an extended lease, use Form 2 in schedule 2 to the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954, Part 2 (Notices) Regulations 2004 instead of this form.

For more information, you may like to read about s25 notices and the procedure for issuing them.

Contents

  • Prescribed form of notice to be served by landlord wishing to end a business tenancy under s25 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954
  • Section 30(1) grounds for opposing the tenant application
  • Tenant’s rights under part 1 of the Leasehold Reform Act 1967
  • Explanatory notes and guidance on how to complete the form
Draftsman

This document was written by a solicitor for Net Lawman. It complies with current English law.

What Our Clients Say
  • "I have used you in the past and am always impressed!"

    Diane Bantten (Acquit Debt Recovery)
  • "First class . Written in accessible English - consistently to "you" and rendered down to the true essentials. Saved a great deal of time!"

    Ian Binks
  • "Better we buy the latest basic version of what we do for the clients; keeps us up to date and always gives a flying start to our draftsmanship skills."

    Wentworths Solicitors