Mortgages for shared ownership

| 1 min read

Shared ownership is a governmental scheme which makes home buying easier. You will be buying only a part of the house and will rent the rest. This will impact the amount you will have to borrow and the deposit you will be required to arrange. For everything relating to shared ownership mortgages, read on.

What is shared ownership?

Shared ownership is a governmental scheme helped people climb up the property latter who cannot afford to buy on the open market. You can buy a new home with as little as a 25% share in the property and a 5% deposit, rather than purchasing the entire property.

You will be renting the rest of the property from the local housing association. The rent charged is also less than the rent charged in the open market.

How can you qualify for shared ownership?

Shared ownership scheme is for first-time buyers, or if you already have a home, you must be in the process of selling it. Further, your annual household income has to be less than £80,000 (£90,000 in London). Additionally, you will have to arrange for a 5% or 10% deposit.

What are shared ownership mortgages?

For shared ownership properties, you have to pay at least 25% of the price of the property and rent the remaining portion from the local housing association. If you do not have that much money, then you will need a mortgage.

However, the mainstream mortgage lenders will not lend to you if you are on shared ownership. Therefore, you will have to find a specialist mortgage. Further, the interest rates on shared ownership mortgages are high because not many mortgage lenders offer shared ownership mortgages.

How can you find the best shared ownership mortgage deal?

A mortgage broker can be invaluable if you want to opt for a shared ownership scheme. A good mortgage broker will be aware of the various products that are available and will also be able to advise you on the lending criteria for those mortgage lenders.

How does the loan to value ratio work in shared ownership mortgages?

The loan to value ratio works different in shared ownership mortgages, as compared to standard mortgages. The loan to value ratio is calculated just on the portion you will be buying.

Suppose that you are buying a 50% share in a flat which is worth £200,000. You will need to a mortgage for £100,000 that will cover the share in the flat and the deposit.

Can you increase your share in the shared ownership home?

After you have lived in the home for a set period, then you can choose to increase your share in the property. You will have to check if the local housing association allows you 100% ownership. This is called staircasing.

Remortgaging for shared ownership properties

Remortgaging for shared ownership properties is not much different from a standard remortgage. However, since the number of lenders lending on shared ownership properties is less, you will have fewer choices of products available.

It would be best if you can buy the property by staircasing to 100% if you can afford it. As then, you will become eligible for a standard mortgage and will have more variety of cheaper mortgages to choose from.

Please note that the information provided on this page:

  • Does not provide a complete or authoritative statement of the law;
  • Does not constitute legal advice by Net Lawman;
  • Does not create a contractual relationship;
  • Does not form part of any other advice, whether paid or free.
Contact us about this article

We would love to hear what you think about this article and how we could improve it. Please do let us know. However, we shan't be able to reply to your specific questions. If you have a question about a document, please contact us.

Leave feedback about this page